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Bozeman man appears in court after reportedly discharging gun while law enforcement investigate disturbance

Gregg Alan Fuller, 48, was charged with partner family member assault, criminal endangerment and tampering with evidence in Gallatin County Justice Court

BOZEMAN – A Bozeman man is facing a $100,000 bond and several charges after Gallatin County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a domestic disturbance on Wednesday, July 3.

Gregg Alan Fuller, 48, was charged with partner family member assault, criminal endangerment and tampering with evidence in Gallatin County Justice Court Friday morning.

According to charging documents, Gallatin County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a call shortly after midnight on July 3. A reporting party called law enforcement stating that Fuller had smashed her phone and was “going to get guns.”

When the deputies arrived at the scene, they allegedly saw Fuller near a vehicle in the yard. When ordered twice to show his hands, Fuller reported stated “No” and entered the vehicle. After a short time, Fuller then exited the vehicle and ran into the house with the deputies pursuing.

When ordered to stop or he’d be tased, Fuller reportedly said “No” and ran up the stairs as a deputy deployed a taser, which did not make contact with Fuller. A few seconds later, law enforcement heard what sounded to be a single gunshot upstairs.

The victims were escorted out of the home and a negotiator spent the next several hours attempting to talk Fuller out of the home but was unsuccessful. Since the known charges at that time were misdemeanors, law enforcement left the scene. Fuller was later contacted and brought into the Law and Justice Center.

During an interview with investigators, Fuller stated that he had run upstairs and grabbed a .45 caliber handgun after law enforcement had chased him into the house. He reportedly stated that he tripped over his dog in the bedroom and accidentally discharged the firearm as he was falling. Fuller told officers after he woke up in the morning he patched and repainted the bullet holes in the door and adjoining bedroom wall because he did not want his kids to see the damage. Court documents say this action meets the definition of tampering with physical evidence.

For the PFMA, Fuller faces between 24 hours to one year, possibly 40 hours of anger management and between $100 to $1,000 in fines.

For criminal endangerment, Fuller faces up to $50,000 in fines and up to 10 years in prison.

For tampering with evidence, up to $10,000 in fines and, again, up to 10 years in prison.

The judge set his bond at $100,000, while the state originally requested $250,000 due to his past cases of similar crimes, including a mirroring standoff that happened in June that is still pending in court.

Fuller was also ordered to GPS monitoring, must stay at least 1,500 feet away from the home and from the victim/child. He also cannot have any weapons and will get a one-time escort to the home for personal belongings, if he posts bond.

Fuller reportedly is a former commercial pilot who was released due to a medical condition.

His next court appearance is set for July 19.

MTN News

MTN News

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